A Bunch of Old White Men Rally to Oppose Gambling

Okay, that’s not really the headline, but looking at the picture accompanying the story might lead one to believe it is.

anti-gambling-rally

Dan Ireland a long time opponent to gambling leads a press conference on the steps of the Alabama State House on the second day of the Alabama legislative session in Montgomery, Ala., on Wednesday Jan. 14, 2010. ( The Birmingham News/Frank Couch )

These guys have every right to oppose gambling. Personally, I think it’s a short-sighted approach to solving the structural problems that plague Alabama’s budget — over-reliance on sales and income taxes, for one great big thing. What I want to know is where the heck are they when Alabama Arise rallies for tax reform, constitutional reform, better treatment Viagra 100mg of the poor? Why don’t they put the power of their voices and their congregations behind the dreamers who believe we can build a better, more just world?

I guess it’s easier to rail against “evil” than it is to reach for the light.

(This is not to say that none of the people pictured ever does anything to help the poor, but I know from experience how difficult it is to get faith communities involved in social justice work. Giving someone a handout is easy; trying to change systems that perpetuate poverty is hard. And it might offend big donors, who’ll take their pledge money and go down the street to the congregation that doesn’t “do politics”.)

3 Responses to “A Bunch of Old White Men Rally to Oppose Gambling”

  1. mooncat says:

    Well said, Kathy!

    What I want to know is where the heck are they when Alabama Arise rallies for tax reform, constitutional reform, better treatment of the poor? Why don’t they put the power of their voices and their congregations behind the dreamers who believe we can build a better, more just world?

    I don’t for a moment believe all the naysayers are bad people who don’t care about the poor and downtrodden, but those aren’t the issues they’re willing to put elbow grease into, whereas opposing the evil gambling (or gourmet beer) are. It’s a damned shame.

  2. Kathy says:

    I know the “evils” of gamblin’ and drankin’ are simple and easy to explain. Tax reform is a lot more complex, and it requires the ability to care about the welfare of people one doesn’t know personally. Even the preachers who want to be involved in social justice work get tremendous pushback from congregants who aren’t comfortable with it. And the congregants pay their salaries. Sometimes I find the real world to be a depressing place.

  3. Helen says:

    Right on, Mooncat. And writing on MLK’s actual birthday, I’m thinking about all those who took great risk, and those who weren’t up to doing so back then but now happily participate in all the commemorative rituals.

    Recently a legislator mentioned how colleagues said they really supported a good bill, but couldn’t take the risk to vote for it.

    Thanks to all who did what was right, no matter the consequences.

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