Del, Perhaps We Should Consider Moving

The Environmental Protection Agency published a study today warning Southern states to expect serious consequences from the ongoing effects of global warming. Gulf Coast states are most at risk.

…The Gulf Coast states, in particular, will be hit with more flooding and other problems from more frequent and intense storms and forest fires, according to the federal report. Other effects expected in the South include higher air pollution and a longer pollen season…

Commenters at al.com immediately showed their less than stellar reading comprehension by going on the attack against Al Gore and “bed wetting wackos”. Those are presumably the liberal, environment-lovin’ wackos of the Bush Administration’s EPA. I wasn’t aware they had hired Al Gore.

However, all is not lost. I scrolled down a bit and found this comment from truthsleuth:

Here’s the way I look at it – just in case, wouldn’t it be best to address global warming than debating if it is real or not? Because if it is real, as most reputable scientists believe, and we spend all our time debating about it and doing nothing about it, we’re in a heap load of trouble.

If it isn’t real and we do something about it, we’ll have less dependency on the profiteering of big oil companies in the middle east and at home; we’ll have less dependence on monopoly utilities here at home; we’ll reinvigorate our economy by reinvesting in aging infrastructure and new technologies; we’ll improve our health by reducing air and water pollution; and more benefits.

Let’s prepare ourselves for the potential impacts of global warming instead of debating over whether or not the sky is fall – just in case. In the end, no matter the validity of the global warming critics and supporters, if we take action now, we’ll have a stronger economy, improved public health, and cleaner environment for generations to come. We have the solutions – let’s put those solutions to work.

Common sense. What a concept!

5 Responses to “Del, Perhaps We Should Consider Moving”

  1. Jonathan says:

    I agree with the idea that the debating over Global Warming is sometimes counterproductive and I want start anything by sharing some of my own personal views on the issue. However, the problem I have with green movements and other global warming initiatives is that they usually involve government mandates or legislation. The government needs to let the people and market determine the fate of the polluters and other non-green industries.

    For example, Obama wants to pass new legislation that would require auto manufacturer’s to build vehicles that get a minimum miles per gallon and other environmentally friendly concepts. This is so wrong. Not only is this limiting capitalism and the free market, it’s creating a larger, more inefficient government that ends up costing consumers more in the long run.

    Haven’t we already seen a shift in thinking where more people are now aware of green movements? People are choosing to drive Prius’, Echo’s, Focus’, etc to try and help better the environment. SUV sales are falling dramatically and are the lowest they’ve ever been. People are voicing their opinions with their dollars and THAT is what makes manufacturer’s and other companies listen. Pretty soon instead of every car company offering 4 or 5 different model SUV’s there might be just one. R&D dollars will be directed at reducing pollutants and carbon emissions.

    It’s all about awareness and educating people and helping them to choose earth friendly choices. We don’t need the government to force anyone to do anything. Let the people decide and vote with their dollars.

  2. Del says:

    If the government hadn’t laid out thousand of miles of interstate highway and other car-oriented infrastructures, if the government hadn’t offered tax advantages for home mortgages so that everyone could afford a quarter-acre suburban lot…and I’m not even going to mention government interaction with oil companies, foreign oil-rich states, and “energy policy.” Government is always “forcing” people to do things. It’s just not always obvious.

  3. Kathy says:

    It’s all about awareness and educating people and helping them to choose earth friendly choices. We don’t need the government to force anyone to do anything. Let the people decide and vote with their dollars.

    And yet…there’s still a significant contingent of the population that doesn’t “believe in” global warming. There’s also a significant contingent that believes God gave Man dominion over creation, which means they can do whatever the hell they want with it, and damn the long-term consequences. I suspect those two groups intersect at least in part. If we wait for those folks to come around, it may very well be too late for all of us.

    Perhaps if we actually had a free market, and everyone had access to all the information, then capitalism could work its magic. That only happens in Econ class. As it is, corporations don’t look beyond next quarter’s results, assuming they can get past this week’s stock price. They may or may not have a few legislators on their payrolls to help protect them from too much market force. And they pay publicists and lobbyists to keep real information about health risks or environmental damage away from customers or regulators.

    I think this is bigger than a few industries making grudging changes well after they were needed. One problem with waiting on the auto industry, for instance, is that auto purchases are not, for most people, even an every year event. Most of us keep the cars we have for a relatively long time. It took $4/gallon gas to generate real pressure for change, and there are still plenty of people driving their Expeditions down the block to the grocery store. We’re talking major changes in infrastructure. Alabama has ignored the need for reliable public transportation for decades now, and the kind of capital needed to put the structure in place in anything resembling a timely basis is beyond the reach of individual corporations.

    It’s going to require an effective public/private partnership to address global warming and other environmental issues before they become insurmountable disasters. I think it can be done in a way that’s win/win for business and consumers, but we need to get moving. In fact, we needed to get moving ten years ago, but so far no one has invented a Tardis. :)

  4. Jonathan says:

    And yet…there’s still a significant contingent of the population that doesn’t “believe in” global warming. There’s also a significant contingent that believes God gave Man dominion over creation, which means they can do whatever the hell they want with it, and damn the long-term consequences.

    As I’m sure you’ve all figured out by now, I’m of a conservative persuasion, so I do have some differing opinions regarding global warming and mankind’s impact on it. Just like there are lobbyists and publicists for the government, there are also those people for scientists and other organizations. It’s interesting to follow the money trail of some of these major research organizations to see who’s actually funding their research (and results).

    Having said that, I am one of those Christian fundamentalists that believe God DID give us dominion over all creation. But I don’t believe that gives us carte blanche to do as we wish. God clearly instructed us to be good stewards of the blessings and resources he has given us which includes taking care of our planet.

    Just because I have my opinions on the causes of global warming, doesn’t mean I don’t recycle or strive to make changes where I can. But am I going to give up my “big ‘ole pickup truck” that gets 15mpg? Nope, because I actually need it and use it. If I could get away with a Honda Civic, don’t think I wouldn’t.

    Don’t really know where I was headed with all of this other than to let you know there are those of us who question global warming (or climate change as it’s now being called due to the cooling cycle we’re experiencing), but still do our part to be “green”.

  5. Kathy says:

    Jonathan, I apologize. I was not at all clear. There are plenty of people of faith of all political persuasions who interpret dominion over creation just as you say, and I didn’t make that distinction. That’s what comes of assuming everyone will know what I mean.

    I’m right there with you on the vehicle situation. I’d get rid of my momvan today and buy a Prius — if we could afford it.

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